SWEPCO has no Power in Missouri

SWEPCO is not wanted in Missouri.  The ARMO project is dead in the water. ARMO is the Arkansas Missouri AEP/SWEPCO project.

 

This is what would need to happen in order to build the 345,000 Volt transmission line:

  1. SWEPCO must apply for and be granted utility status in MO.

  2. SWEPCO must get its application for a 345 kV line and Route 109 approved in MO.

  3. SWEPCO must be granted the power of eminent domain to condemn land in MO.

 

SWEPCO is not going to get approval from the Missouri Public Service Commission to become a utility. Route 109 does not service anyone in Missouri; it only connects Shipe Station with the Kings River Station. The Missouri PSC will not be happy having this nasty problem dropped on their lap with no benefit to Missouri.

 

On the April 3, 2013 application, SWEPCO in essence said they did not want to deal with the Public Service Commission in Missouri, and did not want this route. Now, they will have to get on their knees and beg, as 55% of the line is in Missouri.

 

Public opposition in Missouri with the help of the Missouri Public officials will never let this happen. Why would they want to help SWEPCO?

 

You may remember SWEPCO did not notify many Missouri land owners traversed by Route 109 in April 2013. Some were not notified as late as the August Little Rock APSC hearings.

 

The Missouri utilities and electric cooperatives have been providing great service and their customers like them; they all go to the annual co-op meetings, have picnics and are treated with respect, no security is needed!

 

The real mystery is: Why did SWEPCO included route 109 in their application, if from the beginning they said they did not want this route? They had seven years to plan this project and unlimited resources.

 

Honorable Judge Griffin gave Arkansas a late Xmas present, with an elegant solution to an impossible problem. Thank you very much!

 

I bet you AEP did not bring out the champagne yesterday; they must be licking their wounds.  The Judge said "si, pero NO."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A few Notes

 

ARMO is the name I use for the SWEPCO project.

 

PATH was an AEP interstate monster transmission line project defeated in 2011 by a committed and very smart grass roots organization, StopPATH WV. After that, AEP decided not to use names for projects. The new AEP strategy is to sell projects piecemeal, point to point, so no one really knows what AEP is trying to do.

 

This is handy when facing opposition, whatever they claim is the need for the project, can be changed again with a few documents. By hiring more lawyers than engineers, the “permitting” process is supposed to go smoothly.

 

However, it never does. The 14 mile 345,000 Volt from the Flint Creek station to a new station near Centerton, AR, only 14 miles away, took 20 months to get APSC approval, with 12 different routes and all the combinations of the route segments.

 

The idea seems to be: divide and conquer, and overwhelm the APSC with a long list of possible routes, asking the APSC an illogical question: which route do you like?

 

Time for a short story on illogical thinking, in high school Logic 101 class, to my friend Jim:

If we asked a man if he owns a weed eater, then we can logically deduce he owns a yard, which means he probably owns a house, and if he owns a house he probably has a family which we could then logically deduce that he is straight.

 

Jim thinks that's pretty reasonable, and goes home to try it out on his dad. Hey, Dad, let me show you what we learned in Logic 101 today; tell me, do you own a weed eater? To which the dad replies, No, I don't. Jim’s eyes dilate and his mouths drops open, Dad, your gay?!!?

 

The AEP “where is the red ball” process gets so confusing that some times AEP includes routes they don’t really like, like Route 109!

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